Capuchino High School

English Department

Course Descriptions

Strategic English Support (SES)
GRADE: 9-10 CREDITS 5 COLLEGE RECOMMENDED? NO
PREREQUISITES: Recommendation 

This class is an English elective for students who need additional work on reading skills such as literal comprehension, vocabulary development, inferential comprehension, and critical-applicative comprehension. 9th grade students are enrolled in SES on the basis of their reading test (SRI) scores in 8th grade; 10th grade students are recommended on the basis of their SRI scores and by teacher recommendation.



ENGLISH I CP: 1ST SEMESTER
GRADE: 9 CREDITS: 5 COLLEGE RECOMMENDED? YES
PREREQUISITIES: Freshman standing

Students in CP English I work on the skills they need in both high school and college.  They develop their writing skills by studying and practicing the writing of sentences and paragraphs, an autobiographical narrative,  and an essay. They develop their close reading and analytical skills through the examination of works of fiction and non-fiction, including a novel length text, short stories, and various articles and informational texts.  Students develop speaking skills and increase their academic vocabulary through structured small and large group discussions, as well as group and individual presentations.

 
ENGLISH I CP: 2ND SEMESTER
GRADE 9 CREDITS: 5 COLLEGE RECOMMENDED? YES
PREREQUISITES: Freshman standing

Students in CP English I build upon the reading, writing, and speaking skills introduced and practiced in first semester by writing various forms of essays as well as an original poem. They will continue to read and closely analyze works of fiction and non-fiction, including a novel length text, a dramatic work, short stories, poetry, and various articles and informational texts. Students also develop research and technology skills through both short and long term research.


ENGLISH I AS: 1ST SEMESTER
GRADE: 9 CREDITS: 5 COLLEGE RECOMMENDED? YES
PREREQUISITES: Recommendation of eighth grade teacher and/or counselor.

Freshman English AS focuses on the close analysis of literature and various types of non-fiction texts.  Students are exposed to literary genres such as novels and short stories and through the examination of these texts they become familiar with a variety of literary devices, focusing most heavily on figurative language, diction, elements of plot, and characterization. Students are asked to write extensively, in the form of paragraphs and essays, as well as an autobiographical narrative.  Students develop speaking skills and increase their academic vocabulary through structured small and large group discussions, as well as group and individual presentations.
 

ENGLISH I AS: 2ND SEMESTER
GRADE: 9 CREDITS: 5 COLLEGE RECOMMENDED? YES
PREREQUISITES: Successful completion of English 1-AS or recommendation of instructor.

Second semester Freshman English AS continues to focus on the close analysis of literature and various types of non-fiction texts. Students will also examine a dramatic work and poetry, in addition to short stories and a novel. They will build upon their writing skills by writing various forms of essays as well as original poetry. Students will increase their awareness of various types of literary and rhetorical devices, and analyze how and writers use these in a variety of contexts. Additionally, they will develop research and technology skills through both short and long term research.

ENGLISH II CP
GRADE: 10 CREDITS: 5 COLLEGE RECOMMENDED? YES
PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing

Sophomore students will continue to practice skills introduced during freshman year, including reading, writing, speaking and listening. Particular skills of focus for the Sophomore year include autonomy, empowerment and critical thinking. Students are exposed to multiple worldviews through a diverse range of genres, including argumentative, expository and narrative texts. They will engage extensively in structured discussion, argumentative and creative composition, and student-centered activities. Capstone activities include two argumentative research projects that serve to synthesize the work from each semester.
 

ENGLISH II AS
GRADE: 10 CREDITS: 5 COLLEGE RECOMMENDED? YES
PREREQUISITES: Successful completion of English 2 AS or recommendation of teacher.

This course seeks to provide young adults with the tools necessary to understand, critique, analyze and evaluate the worlds in which they exist in order to make educated decisions, assessments and evaluations in their own lives. The tools that this class sets forth to provide will afford young adults the ability and freedom to lead meaningful, authentic and freely-chosen lives. This class does not seek to merely service the future of students, but instead seeks to assist people in purposeful and useful ways that transcend both the classroom and/or workplace. Therefore, this year’s course objectives will be almost entirely focused on acquiring and honing critical analysis skills.


In order to achieve this, Sophomore students will continue to practice skills introduced during freshman year, including reading, writing, speaking and listening. Particular skills of focus for the Sophomore year include autonomy, empowerment and critical thinking. Students are exposed to multiple worldviews through a diverse range of genres, including argumentative, expository and narrative texts. They will engage extensively in structured discussion, argumentative and creative composition, and student-centered activities. Capstone activities include two argumentative research projects that serve to synthesize the work from each semester.

 
ENGLISH III CP: Semester 1
GRADE: 11 CREDITS: 5 COLLEGE RECOMMENDED? YES
PREREQUISITES: Junior standing

English III CP is a Junior English class designed to enable students to prepare for either a college or business career. In writing, students learn to research a topic, using primary and secondary sources, and to report their findings. Students will continue to improve their writing skills by concentrating on clear and concise essays. Essay genres emphasized are the Autobiographical-Reflective Essay and the Response to Literature Essay. MLA formatting of all essays is required. Major Literary Units include: Early American Voices, Classicism, Transcendentalism, Romanticism, Realism and Modernism in poetry. Additional selections will be drawn primarily from well-known works in American literature such as Arthur Miller’s The Crucible, Thomas Jefferson’s Declaration of Independence, Henry David Thoreau’s “Civil Disobedience,” and  “Half Hanged Mary” poem by Margaret Atwood . Students will build on grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure skills learned in 9th and 10th grades and work toward mastery of grade level sentence and paragraph structure. Students are required to learn 80 new vocabulary words and to read 500 pages a semester.


ENGLISH III CP: Semester 2
GRADE: 11 CREDITS: 5 COLLEGE RECOMMENDED? YES
PREREQUISITES: Junior standing

English III CP is designed to further the skills of Juniors who have completed English II CP. The essay genres assigned are the Response to Literature Essay and Research Paper on a well-known American author. The theme of the semester is The American Dream. The essential question is the following: How did major biographical events, and historical events affect the author and his/her writing?  It continues with the study of 20th Century American writers. Literary selections include: F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, Their Eyes Were Watching God,and the 20th Century Short Story Unit/ Author Research Unit. Students will end the year writing and presenting an informational speech about their chosen American Author. Students will build on grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure skills learned in 9th and 10th grades and complete mastery of grade level sentence and paragraph structure. Students are required to learn 80 new vocabulary words and read 700 pages per semester.


ENGLISH IIII CP
GRADE: 12 CREDITS: 5 COLLEGE RECOMMENDED? YES
PREREQUISITES: Senior standing

The Expository Reading and Writing course (ERWC) prepares college-bound seniors for the literacy demands of higher education. Through a sequence of eight to ten rigorous instructional units, students in this yearlong, rhetoric-based course develop advanced proficiency in expository, analytical, and argumentative reading and writing. Teachers of this course present a scaffolded process for helping students read, comprehend, and respond to nonfiction and literary texts. Units also provide instruction in research methods and documentation conventions. Students will be expected to increase their awareness of the rhetorical strategies employed by authors and to apply those strategies to their own writing. They will read closely to examine the relationship between an author’s argument or theme and his or her audience and purpose; to analyze the impact of structural and rhetorical strategies; and to examine the social, political, and philosophical assumptions that underlie the text. By the end of the course, students will be expected to use this process independently when reading unfamiliar texts and writing in response to them. The ERWC is closely aligned to the seven criteria of the UC English requirements. Students successfully completing this course develop skills, knowledge, processes, and dispositions in speaking rhetorically, and habits of mind.

IB ENGLISH HL I

This is the first year of a two year sequence. Assessments include a presentation, an oral commentary, essays, and creative written tasks. The first semester focuses on the study of language and media using a variety of texts, including academic works, Huckleberry Finn, 1984, and news sources. Some of the topics covered are race in the media, censorship, and language and the state. The second semester features a heavy emphasis on close reading and discussion of three texts: King Lear, Beloved, and The Things They Carried. This portion of the course engages students in critical reading, writing, and thinking about how authors use literary techniques to achieve their purpose.
 

IB ENGLISH HL II

This is the second year of a two year sequence. Year 2 of the IB Language and Literature program aims to explore how language develops in specific cultural contexts, how it impacts the world, and how language shapes both individual and group identity. Students are expected to (1) analyze how audience and purpose affect the structure and content of texts; (2) analyze the impact of language changes; and (3) demonstrate an awareness of how language and meaning are shaped by culture and context. The course will align these learning outcomes with an array of thematically connected texts.  A further exploration of cultural importance associated with gender, power and identity will also be examined with the following texts in mind: Kawabata’s A Thousand Cranes, Faulkner’s The Sound and Fury, and Roy’s The God of Small Things.  Students will be expected to challenge, question, formulate, and develop ideas about different texts, their meaning, purpose and implications about society and its members’ identity.  

 

 

Block, Alison
Teacher
Borcherdt,B, Brittany
Teacher
Connelly, Dan
Teacher
Fong, Jennifer
Teacher
Gabow, Beth
Teacher
Holtz, Michael
Teacher
Horton, Tina
Teacher
Kuy, Teang
Teacher
Lopez-Schmitt, Martee
Teacher
Mendoza, Waleska
Teacher
Rodriguez, Angela
Teacher

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